We17 Events: Graduate Reception

GradReception

Past GMC and Past GPC at We16 Graduate Reception

If you are attending We17, the Graduate Student Reception is a must-attend event. What’s better than food, networking, and socializing with your fellow grad students? This year Autodesk is sponsoring and bringing along some of their best engineers to network with us. This will be a highlight of We17!

Add the event in your conference plan. And check out career opportunities at Autodesk!

What: Graduate Student Reception
When: Friday, Oct 27, 5:00pm – 6:30pm
Where: JW Marriott –Brazos

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3rd Global Grand Challenges Summit

Do you want to connect with international colleagues and tackle the world’s biggest engineering challenges? The National Academy of Engineering (NAE) is hosting a 2-day summit in Washington DC on the Grand Challenges in Engineering. Check it out!

Registration is now open for the 3rd Global Grand Challenges Summit, to be held July 18-20, 2017 in Washington, DC. Sponsored by the US National Academy of Engineering (NAE), the UK Royal Academy of Engineering (RAE), and the Chinese Academy of Engineering (CAE), the Summit will focus on the four themes of the NAE Grand Challenges for Engineering: Sustainability, Health, Security, and Joy of Living, as well as Education and Public Engagement related to the Grand Challenges.

We are expecting about 800 participants, evenly split between students and professionals. Free lodging is available for student attendees, and a travel allowance is available for students from US academic institutions (max 5 per institution). Based on past experience, US registration may close fairly early in order to preserve slots for overseas partners, so we urge you to register at your earliest convenience. For more information and to register please visit www.ggcs2017.org .

How to Benefit from Annual Conference without Attending

How to Benefit from Annual Conference without Attending

As the larger SWE community gets ready to descend on Philadelphia, PA for We16, SWE’s annual conference, many grad students are stuck in class, at the office, or in their research labs. Fret not, dear grad students! There are still ways to benefit from SWE’s annual conference without actually attending. Check out my tips below and comment if you have any tips that I missed.

1. Explore the Career Fair Exhibitors

Are you looking for a job, but will miss out on the SWE Career Fair? Check out the exhibitor list on the We16’s webpage (http://we16.swe.org/conference-agenda/). These companies are looking for SWEsters. Consider applying for the jobs online and reaching out to the recruiters on social media. Many recruiters will be tweeting that they will be at #We16.

Alternatively, browse SWE’s career center any time of the year (http://careers.swe.org/). Many companies also have postings directed towards WE16.

Another option is to find a Career Fair advocate. Convince a friend/colleague who knows you well to approach companies and drop off your resume in person. Make sure to still apply online to those companies, but recruiters will be impressed that you are a SWEet enough job candidate that your friend/colleague was willing to take the time and talk about you to recruiters.

2. Browse Session Titles for Future Collaborators and Event Ideas

Are you an outreach nut? Have you always wanted to work in government but never knew how to start? Or are you looking for your next visiting speaker? Check out the conference agenda (http://we16.swe.org/conference-agenda/) and browse the session titles. If something looks very interesting to you, reach out to the session speakers via LinkedIn or the SWE membership directory.

Do you want to know who from a specific school or company is presenting? Search keywords such as “University of Michigan” or “Central Intelligence Agency” or “Caterpillar Inc.”.

3. Register to Attend Virtually

If the distance and not the time is the only thing preventing you from engaging in We16, consider registering as a virtual attendee. You’ll gain access to special online content and see many of the sessions.

Register here: https://registration.experientevent.com/ShowWEC161/

4. Join in the Social Media Conversation

Find other SWE friends by seeing who is tweeting or posting or instagramming about the SWE conference. People are always giving or looking for advice. Join in the conversation!

Use #SWEGrad and #We16 on twitter and instagram

 

So, did I miss anything? What are your tips for those who won’t be able to attend We16 but still want to be involved?

 

Mentoring Program Updates

Hello Everyone!

Today’s blog is an update on the progress so far from our mentoring program!

Our initial survey was a hit – we had many graduate students indicate they were interested in having a mentor, and we were able to gauge what types of mentors people wanted.  We took this information/some feedback from our graduates and mentors that signed up initially, and we were able to narrow down some of the important aspects of mentor pairs from a graduate perspective.  As a result, we created two new surveys (these MUST be filled out in order to be assigned a mentor!):

 

For Mentors: https://goo.gl/forms/BquyV6ez1fvGRqB43

 

For Graduate Mentees: https://goo.gl/forms/BXTYWIjV8Dj2OC6k2

 

At this time, we are still low on mentors (especially in academia and government), so we are currently waiting for more mentors to sign up in order to pair students interested in these areas with a match!  If you know anyone who may be a good candidate to mentor for this program – please spread the word!  One of the things that impresses me the most about SWE is the ability to access such a huge network of dedicated people who are always willing to help build up our STEM community.  I have been able to access some great committees/ regions/ sections that have been very helpful in promoting this initiative to our membership!

The process of developing a mentoring program takes time to implement, since we are building this for the first time.  There will be another round of mentor pairings sent out within the week for mentor/mentee approval, but for some students with specific requests/ specialized fields, this process is taking a bit of time to find the right match.  I sincerely thank those that have signed up for their continued patience!

Some people have expressed interest in meeting and discussing this program/ meeting other people who have signed up at WE 16!  Though some mentors have set up lunch/ a meeting with their mentees already, another option for this is to join us at our GradSWE meeting on Thursday, October 27th from 10:15 AM to 12:00 PM and meet other students who are involved in mentoring!  We will also be setting up an online group in the near future for mentoring – so anyone who fills out this new survey will be sent the link to access the group if they so choose.  Remember, if you have not filled out the new survey above, you will not be assigned a mentor, or gain access to the mentoring group.

I want to thank you all for your positive feedback and kind words supporting this initiative.  I have received so many wonderful emails and personal stories about how mentoring has impacted people, and how excited people are about the opportunity to try mentoring/ being mentored through GradSWE!  I am so happy that as a result of this program, I am also able to get to know some of you on a personal level as well.   I  hope to get to meet many of you at WE 16!

 

Sincerely,

Genevieve

 

For questions or comments regarding the mentoring program, please email gradswementoring@gmail.com or grad-coordinator-elect@swe.org

Grad Member Spotlight: Celine Liong

19 September 2016

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Celine Liong

PhD student, Bioengineering, expected graduation June 2019

Stanford University

 

Celine helped to start her undergrad (University of California San Diego) SWE chapter’s first Team Tech team. She also helped in piloting the engineering school’s first overnight stay program where UCSD SWE members hosted newly admitted high school students so that they could learn more about the opportunities at UCSD’s engineering and how SWE can serve as a resource.

Celine has been awarded the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship, the National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship (NDSEG), the Stanford Enhancing Diversity in Graduate Education (EDGE)-STEM Fellowship, the UCSD Boeing-IDEA center scholarship, the San Diego SWE continuing student scholarship, and the UCSD SWE-California Space Grant Consortium Research Scholarship. Congratulations, Celine, on all you’ve accomplished! Keep up the great work!

 

What is your degree program (MS/PhD, department)? When do you expect to graduate?

Bioengineering PhD at Stanford. I expect to graduate June 2019.

Give a brief explanation of your research.
I work on electronic skin, a flexible and stretchable electronic device designed to mimic the tactile sensing of real human skin. I hope to apply e-skin to treat phantom limb pain. E-skin can be used to create active neural prostheses so amputees have a sense of touch and a way to treat nerves that are randomly firing. 

What do you hope to do with your degree? What are your career goals?
I hope to work in industry R&D in the future, focusing on wearable electronics that have therapeutics or diagnostic applications. 

What are some of your hobbies? What do you do in your free time?
I like to run, rock climb, and cycle. I also like to bake and take advantage of sunny California weather either by going to the beach or reading outside.
What’s a fun fact about you?
I’ve never watched Lord of the Rings.

Grad Member Spotlight: Bridget Hegarty

5 September 2016

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Bridget Hegarty

PhD student, Environmental Engineering, expected graduation May 2018

Yale University

 

As an outreach chair for three years at her undergraduate institution, Cornell University, Bridget facilitated numerous engineering outreach events.  Since coming to grad school, she founded the Yale section of GradSWE, served as a grad student advisor to undergrad SWE, and helped to facilitate Yale’s recent application to become an official SWE section. Bridget is currently the president of Yale SWE and is working to increase SWE’s presence on campus.

Bridget was a chair for the event which won the Outreach MOU Partnership Award while she was at Cornell, she was awarded the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship as well as the Community Service Award from the Yale University Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. Congratulations, Bridget, on all you’ve accomplished! Keep up the great work!

 

What is your degree program (MS/PhD, department)? When do you expect to graduate?

If all my research stars align, I expect to graduate in May 2018 with a PhD in Environmental Engineering.

 

Give a brief explanation of your research.

I am working to develop gene-network models in cyanobacteria.  We will use these models to guide the genetic engineering of mutant strains of cyanobacteria capable of producing biofuel-precursor molecules at levels sufficient for industrial applications.

 

What do you hope to do with your degree? What are your career goals?

My answer varies with the day.  While most of the time, I respond that “I want to become a professor,” I am still exploring and am also considering careers in academic administration and STEM outreach.

 

What are some of your hobbies? What do you do in your free time?

I travel whenever I have the opportunity; I am a voracious reader and an avid photographer.

 

What’s a fun fact about you?

I will be testing for my black belt in taekwondo within the next year.

Grad Member Spotlight: Ana Ramekar

22 Aug 2016

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Ana Ramekar

MS Candidate, Aerospace Engineering, expected graduation December 2016

University of Maryland, College Park

Ana has served SWE on a local level throughout the Baltimore-Washington Section as the Workshop Host for “Transitioning from School to Industry ‘Backpacks to Briefcases'” and “Communication with Confidence”. She has been a Professional Development Committee member for the “Aspire To Lead” event and a Professional SWE Liaison to University of Maryland as well as the SWE Social Committee Co-Chair. Ana has been nominated for the SWE Emerging Engineer and has been awarded the Women in Color Award and the Region E Professional Development Event Award for the Aspire to Lead event.

 

What is your degree program (MS/PhD, department)? When do you expect to graduate?

Aerospace Engineering MS candidate, January 2014- December 2016

 

 

Give a brief explanation of your research.

My research topic studies protruding aerodynamic shapes and other obstacles to better understand the aircraft performance cost and drag penalty. I’m essentially performing an aerodynamic trade study of obstacles in multiple configurations using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). The results are useful to aircraft designers and planners who make decisions on where to install certain aerodynamic fairings or antennas on aircraft.

 

What do you hope to do with your degree? What are your career goals?

I’ve realized some of the best engineering outcomes are achieved when there are few barriers between the different disciplines on project. I want to apply the skills and knowledge learned in my degree to contribute to a multidisciplinary team and make an exceptional aircraft design. Specifically I want to make Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) tools more accessible earlier in aircraft design process to other ‘non-aerospace’ engineering teams, such as mechanical, structural and systems engineering teams.

 

What are some of your hobbies? What do you do in your free time?

I cherish every moment I get to spend alone. I enjoy photography, drawing and being active. Two years ago took a plunge and enrolled in a yoga teacher training program and immediately started teaching at the campus gym when I got my certification. I taught a 7 am course and tried to help fellow students and undergraduates feel good about being dedicated to their health and setting aside time for quiet reflection. It was a very rewarding experience!

 

What’s a fun fact about you?

I learned to windsurf in the Gunpowder River where I live and pilot a Cessna 172 aircraft so I can attempt to intuitively understand aerodynamic forces and how they dynamically interact with lifting surfaces like sails and wings. At least that’s what I tell myself…