Inclusion-Focused Sessions at WE17

Since the conference is in a little over two weeks, I’m going to take this blog post as an opportunity to highlight some of the conference events that are particularly focused on diversity and inclusion.

Before that, I want to highly encourage anyone attending the conference to check out the many events that the Affinity Groups have planned! These include roundtable discussions, socials, and sessions on issues of particular interest to their group. On Thursday, there’s even a “SWE Affinity Groups Workshop” (10:15 – 11:30 am) where you can learn all about these groups and how to get involved.

Thursday, October 26

“Getting the Diverse Mix to Work Well Together: Lessons Learned on Inclusion Techniques” (2 – 3 pm) – This workshop promise to share best practices on creating an inclusive culture and provide attendees with practical actions to employ right away. If you are looking to foster a more inclusive culture in your lab or university more broadly, this talk seems like a great place to start!

“Real Actions to Overcome Unconscious Biases and Become a More Inclusive Leader” (4:30 – 5:30 pm)—All of us have unconscious biases; what is important is how we act on them. This workshop will teach attendees both how to respond when they are the subject of unconscious bias, as well as how to overcome their own personal biases. Through addressing both of these, attendees will be better able to foster an inclusive culture when they return to their labs or offices. If you are looking for another similar talk, check out “Are you Counted or Do you Count?” on Saturday (10 – 11 am).

“Inclusion Today – LGBTQ and Allies News and Tools for Campus and the Workplace” (10:15 – 11:30 am) – Come to this session to learn about some of the challenges facing LGBTQ individuals, as well as what can be done to support LGBTQ people. This workshop promises time for the attendees to practice some first steps to help realize a more inclusive culture.

Friday, October 27

“TECHing While Woman and with Disability” (10 – 11:15 am) – This panel will explore the challenges of being a woman in STEM and having a debilitating condition. With representatives from academia and industry this panel will explore an important, but often overlooked, facet of diversity.

“Breaking down Stigmas and Building Awareness: Mental Health” (1:30 – 2:30 pm) – Attendees will be provided with practical tools to help themselves and those around them be successful, despite a mental illness. By helping breakdown the barriers around mental health, we can help people get help earlier and build more inclusive communities.

“Advocating for Inclusion – A Male’s Perspective” (4 – 5 pm) – Whether you are a man seeking suggestions of how to better promote inclusion of women in your organization or a woman wondering about how best to engage men on diversity issues, this promises to be an informative panel. Men will be able to learn from other men strategies that have worked and women can gain new strategies for best enabling their male allies.

“Courageous Conversations on Diversity and Inclusion” (4 – 5 pm) – If you are looking for a chance to practice the tough conversations necessary to create culture shifts in an organization, then this is the session for you. After giving participants and overview of inclusion strategies that work, there will be an opportunity to practice these strategies in a supportive environment.

Saturday, October 28

“Women of Color in Engineering: Challenges, Opportunities, and Factors to Enhance Inclusion and Retention” (1:30 – 2:30 pm) – Panelists will both share their personal experiences as a women of color in the US, as well as specific, evidence-based strategies that have been proven to increase inclusion and retention of more women of color in engineering.

“Switching Sides – My Professional Journey over the Rainbow” (10 – 11:15 am) – Using the personal story of the presenter in coming out, this session will teach attendees the power of being yourself in furthering your career and the success of their organization.

Still looking for more talks related to diversity and inclusion? Download the WE Events App or check out the WE17 Conference website here. There are even more events under the “Inclusion and Cultural Awareness” session type filter.

If you are attending the conference, hopefully, you’ll be able to take advantage of some of these sessions to gain new tips to foster a more inclusive culture in your lab or department!

 

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Increasing Inclusion: Allies for Gender Equality

Allies are an answer to the question: “how can I support (or be supported by) another group of people?” We are increasingly realizing that diversity issues are not only the concern of minority groups. Sexism doesn’t only affect women; racism, people of color; homophobia, LGBTQ individuals; and so on. The idea of allies brings everyone to the table.

As a woman in engineering, I know firsthand how engaging men can change the conversation to realize truly inclusive practices. This blog post is to help female graduate students find allies, as well as for male graduate students who want to support the women engineers around them.

Although this post was written for the gradSWE community with gender bias in mind, the resources I have included are for anyone who seeks to be a better advocate for another group. Numerous excellent guides exist on becoming a more effective ally or finding an ally for yourself. If you would like to read more, the links that I have provided at the end of this post are a great starting place.

What is an ally and why are they important?

At its most basic level, “An ally is any person who supports, empowers, or stands up for another person or a group of people” (http://ctb.ku.edu/en/table-of-contents/culture/cultural-competence/be-an-ally/main). Robin Hauser Reynolds, whose documentary Code: Debugging the Gender Gap explores the problems facing women in tech, as well as solutions, gives a more practical definition: “A male ally is a man who will advocate for women even when there are no women in the room” (https://www.progressivewomensleadership.com/the-power-of-the-male-ally-engaging-men-advancing-women/).

This definition gets to the heart of why allies matter. Allies have power in the setting that the group they are helping doesn’t have. They are often able to speak up on behalf of another group in a way that is more likely to be heard. This gives allies a special ability to affect change.

I’m seeking allies, where do I start?

If you are seeking allies, then I highly recommend these resources for more information: https://www.progressivewomensleadership.com/the-power-of-the-male-ally-engaging-men-advancing-women/, https://www.maconferenceforwomen.org/engaging-men-critical-creating-inclusive-culture/. I found a lot of good tips for seeking male allies in them. To summarize some takeaways from those articles:

  1. look for individuals who have empathy
  2. meet new people and try to engage people who are different from you
  3. seek out mentors who are not of your group
  4. assume positive intent

Finally, only cultivate a relationship with someone willing to listen and learn from you. An effective ally won’t always be a perfect advocate; however, it is critical that they listen to and support you. If this is not the case, then seek elsewhere for a new ally, as it is most important to find someone who can empower you.

How can I become an effective ally?

To me, being an effective ally means recognizing, and then acting, when we have power in a situation to advocate for a marginalized group. However, stating that an ally should act in this way is the easy part. How can we actually do this?

Over and over again, as I was reading about being an ally, the importance of listening was emphasized. It is impossible to be an effective ally if we assume we know what the group we are supporting wants without taking the time to listen to them and being willing to learn from those who are different from us. Furthermore, this isn’t something that an ally can do once. We must be willing to continually learn, so that we can truly advocate on the behalf of others who have different and complex needs.

Before being able to act as an ally, we also have to examine our motivation. If we are acting from a place of guilt or, alternatively, from a place of superiority, it is impossible to be an effective ally. We have to see ourselves as equals as those we seeking to empower and be willing to learn from them.

Along the way, we will make mistakes. Therefore, being an ally also requires being adaptable and recognizing when our well-intentioned actions are not helpful. When this happens, we can’t give up, but have to apologize and learn from our mistakes.

Concluding Thoughts

The value of allies is becoming increasingly recognized as more of us realize that diversity issues are not only the concern of minority groups and that developing truly inclusive academic and work environments is all of our responsibility. In this post, I focused on those who already recognize that gender bias both exists and is a problem. In later posts, I will explore more fully how we can start to engage those who don’t already believe that diversity issues affect them.

As always, reach out to gradswe.dil@gmail.com if you have any comments or questions.

Resources

General information about being an ally. These two guides aren’t targeted towards any one group, but the explore the topic quite extensively.

Here are some guides for women seeking to engage male allies:

And here are some resources for men seeking to become effective allies for women:

This is an in-depth report of the growth and development of male allies in the workplace:

Welcome from the FY18 Diversity and Inclusion Liaison!

Hi GradSWE! My name is Bridget Hegarty and I am a PhD student at Yale University in environmental engineering. I am so excited to join the GradSWE Leadership Team as the Diversity and Inclusion Liaison (DIL) this year! This role is a new one for the Grad Leadership Team, so I will start my first post with an overview of what I hope to accomplish and wrap it up with some of SWE’s resources on this topic.

What is the DIL? 

This role was created to facilitate relationships between affiliate groups and grad student members in order to further promote the inclusion of minority groups in engineering. Through this position, I will work to support minority grad students in two main ways. The first will be to connect women and minorities in STEM with SWE’s resources whether or not they have an active local section. My second focus will be to create tools and initiatives that grad groups can use to increase diversity and foster inclusion on their own campuses.

What are my plans for the coming year?

Before getting this role, I didn’t know anything about SWE’s affinity groups. Therefore, my first task is to introduce them to the grad community. To learn more about them, check out the end of this post. Alongside connecting interested GradSWE members with the affinity groups, I will also be collaborating with their leaders to better engage grad members.

Additionally, I will be collecting best practices and creating toolkits that gradSWE sections can use to increase their own D&I efforts. I will start my efforts by focusing on ways that SWE sections can help to increase both the diversity of applicants to grad school and their subsequent recruitment. If you have any thoughts on this topic, whether it is an initiative that has been successfully implemented at your university or an idea that you think is worth exploring, then please send them to gradswe.dil@gmail.com.

What resources does SWE already have for D&I?

Affinity Groups

Affinity groups exist at the society level to bring together SWE members that share a common identity. They are open to anyone in SWE and are a great way for grad students to get involved with the broader SWE community. In addition to being a resource for their members and a platform for networking, they advise SWE on issues affecting their group’s interests. You can read more about them here: http://bit.ly/2hsU5FO.

If you are interested in reaching out to any of SWE’s affinity groups, check out their Facebook pages: SWE African-American AGSWE Latinos AGSWE Native-American AGSWE LGBTQ And Allies AGSWE Global Women Engineers AGSWE Small Business AGSWE Women in Government AG and SWE Entrepreneurs AG.

Joint Memberships           

SWE also offers reduced membership rates to members of the National Society of Black Engineers, the American Indian Science & Engineering Society, and the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers. To learn more about the options available, check out: http://bit.ly/2hsMjvC.

SWE’s Research and Trends for Women in STEM Website

If you are looking for either an overview of trends or an in-depth look at the research surrounding women in engineering, then research.swe.org should be your first step. Launched last year, this site brings together the latest research on women in engineering. It hosts the results of SWE’s own studies on women in engineering, their annual literature reviews, and contains links to many other sources of information.

Diversity and Inclusion Knowledge Cards

These cards were developed to act as a catalyst for discussion on D&I and to help guide reflection on how companies can foster a welcoming environment. Each card presents a key aspect of identifying unconscious bias. They were developed by SWE and Arup to be tailored to the specific needs of the engineering community.

How can you contact me?

As this role is new, my efforts will be evolving based on your input. I look forward to hearing from you at gradswe.dil@gmail.com!