Grad Member Spotlight: Angelica Payne

 

Angelica

 

Angelica Payne

Product Design and Development Engineer

M.S. Biomedical Engineering

B.S. Mechanical Engineering

 

Angelica has been a member of SWE since 2007. She currently serves as the GradSWE Mentoring Co-Coordinator. In college, she was Vice President of her SWE section where she led outreach events, and has been involved with local STEM outreach events ever since. Having worked in both academia and industry, in February of 2017 she served as a panelist for the seminar Transitioning into the Unknown: Careers in Industry, Academia, and Government. She also served as Vice President of Pi Tau Sigma, a mechanical engineering honor society, where she started and ran a peer tutoring program for major classes.

 

In 2013, Angelica was selected from a global pool of applicants as a participant in the NASA Space Radiation Summer School program, where she took second place in a slide competition for her explanation of Multicolored FISH. She was awarded the Initiative for Maximizing Student Diversity fellowship and North Carolina Space Grant for two consecutive years during her graduate education, and won a research presentation competition at a minority conference at Shaw University for her work on the impacts of space radiation and microgravity on bone.

 

What is your degree program (MS/PhD, department)? When do you expect to graduate?

I graduated with my Master’s degree in Biomedical Engineering in 2014 from the Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering at North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Give a brief explanation of your research experience.


I researched the short-term response of clinical doses of acute radiation exposure on pediatric bone. Radiation is known to cause severe bone loss weeks after exposure as characterized in space flight and clinical settings, but the cellular responses responsible for these effects are not well known. I saw that in pediatric applications in particular, within a week of radiation exposure, there appeared to be a small amount of increased bone mass before the dramatic losses in trabecular bone we’re accustomed to observing. This could influence treatment regimens in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia radiation therapy, where the lifetime effects of exposure on bone range from stunted growth to deformities.

What do you hope to do with your degree? What are your career goals?


One of the aspects I enjoyed most about my research was the translational aspect of it. There are direct correlations to what I saw in the lab and how that can be compared to the clinic. I currently work as a mechanical design engineer, often developing medical equipment to improve laboratory procedures or tests. I would like to focus my career solely on medical device development, with a preference toward translational projects that bring research discoveries to clinical implementation in radiation or orthopedics.

What are some of your hobbies? What do you do in your free time?


A few years ago, my (now) husband and I got engaged at the very beginning of our south to north section hiking saga of the Appalachian trail. In our free time, we can usually be found hiking, spending time with family and close friends, and volunteering with the food bank or home building and disaster relief efforts.

What’s a fun fact about you?

I’m from Niagara Falls, NY and got my start with wilderness tripping by canoeing in Canada in the summers, and used to be a Level II whitewater canoeing instructor.

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